Featured

The 18th London Turkish Film Festival is taking place from today (February 21) until March 3. Read on for the low-down.

What’s it all about?

The 18th London Turkish Film Festival runs from February 21 to March 3, 2013, at The Odeon West End, The Rio Cinema Dalston, The Institute of Contemporary Arts and The Cine Lumiere.

The festival celebrates another year of outstanding achievement that has seen Turkish films honored at festivals around the world from Sundance to Berlin. Over its 18 year history, the festival has screened over 250 feature and 350 short and documentary films.

What are this year’s highlights?

* The World Premiere of The Butterfly’s dream, the new film from writer/director Yilmaz Erdogan starring popular heartthrob Kivanc Tatlitug at a glittering Opening Night Gala at The Odeon West End.

* A masterclass with internationally renowned Turkish director, Reha Erdem.

* Films from veteran names of Turkish cinema as well as the debut features of an exciting new generation of Turkish moviemakers.
A diverse selection of short films, with many of the filmmakers themselves on hand to meet their audiences.

What are the Golden Wings awards?

Five outstanding films will compete for the unique Golden Wings Digiturk Digital Distribution Award, worth £30,000. The winning film will be distributed in cinemas throughout the UK and made available via home digital platforms.

This year’s competing films are:  Night of Silence – Reis Çelik’s 2012 Berlin Film Festival prize-winner; Jin– the latest film from Reha Erdem, direct from Berlin 2013; Can – Raşit Çelikezer’s Sundance Jury Award winner; Beyond the Hill directed by Tepenin Ardi andSomewhere in Between directed by Yeşim Ustaoğlu.

The Golden Wings Lifetime Achievement Award

This year the festival will honor legendary actor and director Kadir Inanir, who will be the special guest at the Opening Night Gala and will be attending a Q&A screening of his new film Farewell Katya. In previous years the festival has recognized the life and work of such cinematic greats as Türkan Şoray, Şener Şen and Hülya Koçyiğit.

Golden Wings People’s Choice Award Voted for by visitors to the Festival at venues across London. This year more than 20 features will be competing.

The Jury

Wendy Mitchell, editor of Screen International and ScreenDaily.com.
Edward Fletcher, joint managing director of Soda Pictures.
Tony Grisoni, writer Tony Grisoni has worked with many of the finest contemporary filmmakers including Michael Winterbottom, John Boorman, Rankin, Julian Jarrold, James Marsh and Anand Tucker. He is best known for his collaboration with Terry Gilliam on a number of projects including Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and the ill-fated Don Quixote. He has written and directed a number of award-winning short films. His latest screenplay is the four-part series Southcliffe, produced by Warp Films, which will be screened on Channel 4 this year.

Sedef Ecer, Turkish actress, journalist and playwright Sedef Ecer’s plays have been staged in some of the world’s most renowned theatres and have been acclaimed with major awards. She is currently working with the Oscar-winning director Randa Haines on two feature-length films.

A word from festival director, Vedide Kaymak

“Over the last decade, Turkish filmmakers, not only in Turkey, but also those living in the rest of the world, have found new creative directions, making critically acclaimed films, and winning awards all over the world. The LTFF has always had an inclusive approach towards programming, and I am especially excited by our expanded programme this year.”

The 2013 line up

Feature films

BEYOND THE HILL (Emin Alper)

THE BUTTERFLY’S DREAM (Yilmaz Erdogan)

CAN (Raşit Çelikezer)

CANDLE TO WATER (Nihat Seven)

THE CIRCLE WITHIN (Deniz Cinar)

FAREWELL KATYA (Ahmet Sönmez)

JIN (Reha Erdem)

KING OF COTTON (Omer Can)

LOVE AND REVOLUTION (F. Serkan Acar)

LOVE IN THE SECRET GARDEN (Zeynep Ustunipek)

NIGHT OF SILENCE (Reis Çelik)

OTHER ANGELS (Emre Yalgın)

PRESENT TENSE (Belmin Söylemez)

SAINT AYSE (Elfe Uluç)

SOMEWHERE IN BETWEEN (Yeşim Ustaoğlu)

THE STRANGER (Filiz Alpgezmen)

TO BETTER DAYS (Nihat Seven)

THE TRACE (M. Tayfur Aydın)

WHAT REMAINS(Çiğdem Vitrinel )

YOUR BEAUTY IS WORTH NOTHING (Huseyin Tabak)

Documentary films

A BREATH WITH PINA BAUSCH (Huseyin Karabey)

I FLEW YOU STAYED (Mizgin Mujde Arsian)

LIFE AS A FABLE A NARRATIVE! (Huseyin Karabey)

SIMURGH (Ruhi Karadağ)

SOUND OF ISTIKLAL (Elif Mermer)

TURKISH A+ (Murat Bayramoglu)

Short films:

A COOKIE TALE (Ilkyaz Kocatepe)

INADVERTENTLY (Tunc Erenkus)

LANDESCAPES (Damla Kirkali)

MIRROR (Bedirhan Sakci)

RESTING ROOM (Hakan Burcuglu)

SHIFT 12-48 (Fatih Ozdemir)

TURKISH DREAM (Oguzhan Akalin)

VELVET SOCKS (Ahmet Baturay Tavkul)

For further information on the festival please visit: www.ltff.co.uk

Related Video:

Featured

Friends and family are beginning to book tickets for this summer’s slew of festivals. I flattered they thought to invite me along, but as regular readers of CD-Traveller will know: I am not a fan of festivals.

Last summer – my first one in the UK in five years – I watched with horror as every weekend, friends and family (who are old enough to have known better) traipsed up and down the country to attend arts and lifestyle festivals. Finally, I thought I had better find out what all the fuss was about so, against my better judgment, I gave in and signed up for my first festival.

I can safely say: I thought it would be my last. As I sat squashed among a car full of camping gear, I listed to my mates (all confirmed festival enthusiasts) rave about the crowd that festivals attract. Festival goers, they informed me, are just fabulous. So free-spirited and spontaneous, such characters.

I couldn’t disagree more. On arrival, I found a field full of identikit women and men clad in the skimpiest of denim shirts and Hunter wellington boots, at £100 a pair. (Recession? What recession!)

When I’d had my fill of people watching, I ‘got’ to spend an hour queuing for a beer before sitting in a tent and listening to a band (whose speakers system sounded like it was snapped up at a car boor sale) play.

Finally, it was time to go to sleep – in a soggy field with a few thousand fellow festival goers, all of whom you can be sure will want to use the 10 toilets at exactly the same time in the morning. For this privilege, I (and my fellow festival-goers) were required to cough up, upwards of £100 per ticket….

I returned home with my mind made up: my first festival would most definitely be my last. Fast forward six short months tho, and I am being urged to consider Croatia this year owing to, wait for it, the country’s sizzling festivals!

Forget the mud and endless queues at UK festivals… it’s time to swap my wellies for flip flops and check out Croatia (which this summer will be home to eight electrifying festivals) or so the argument goes. I am told that Croatia is the music scene’s best-kept secret.

The season kick starts in June with INmusic (29-30 June), a two day festival in Zagreb, described as ‘Glastonbury’s sunny Croatian alternative’. Then there’s the Hideout Festival (29 June – 1 July) over on the island of Pag, which takes place across four beach-side clubs. The summer season continues with back-to-back festivals throughout July in the tiny town of Tisno on Murter Island; Garden Festival (4-11 July), Electric Elephant (12-16 July), Soundwave (19-23 July), SuncéBeat (25-31 July) and Stop Making Sense (2-6 August) before wrapping up with the world’s biggest dubstep festival in Pula – Outlook Festival (30 August – 2 September) – which is held in an incredible abandoned fort in this ancient Roman city.

My friends are urging me to reconsider my festival ban claiming that in Croatia, it is easy to combine the fun of a festival with a chilled out beach holiday or a fascinating cultural fix. However- after my experience of the UK festival circuit – I am yet to be convinced. So over to you, dear reader … in the words of The Clash, “Should I stay or should I go?”

Related Video: